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very quickly because the economy can't continue the way it is among other things giving gasoline away. they can't go on that way. >> nick raised the question of ideology. it's important to note that the opposition it wasn't an election about ideology. the opposition, what was fascinating about it is it ran on a comain to administer it more efficiently. they accepted the social missions. they accepted even the foreign policy. dressed in red. he was in some ways praising chavez and saying that maduro wasn't worthy. he see it wasn't an election about ideology but an election about continuing the goals. it's been remarkable. the way to think about it is to step back and really consider that this remarkable experiment in social democracy that we've seen more in south america than central america and mexico but a little bit in central america since for the last 10, 15 years beginning in some ways with chavez's election is outlasting. it's first-generation of leaders. lula went through his two terms. >> charlie: many people say he was a champion of the people who chavez thought he was the ch
know you're aware that six of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world are located in sub-saharan africa, and it is my hope to the extent possible that the state department will prioritize trade with the african nation. you should know that we have a bipartisan bicameral effort working in conjunction with chairman smith to quickly put forward a renewal of the africa growth and opportunity act. so i have four questions i would like to ask you. i wanted to know what steps are you taking to focus on africa's extraordinary growth potential? what are your thoughts about the u.s. appointing a special envoy to the drc? does the request for peacekeeping operations accurately reflect the growing needs on the continent? and can you comment on the significance of the 6% cut to usaid hiv/aids funding? >> thank you very much, congresswoman. let me emphasize first of all that we were really pleased that pepfar was able to be held whole. i think that's vital. i have personally visited, i was in durbin, north of durbin, in the mountains watching of the program is being effectively adminis
.s. economy is headed south. lots of negative indicators recently, what do you say? >> i think that the u.s. economy is already in the south. if you will, and we don't show many signs of coming back, because of very bad policies coming out of washington. i mean, these things should be-- we should be lowering tax rates and broadening the tax base and controlling spending where it should be controlled and having free trade, minimal regulations, but we're going in the wrong direction, stuart. i think you're right. >> what about that question about everybody printing money? well, they are, we know that, but, i don't think it's working this time around. it's just not, you know, juicing the stock market like it used to. >> i don't think it used to so i agree with you totally. you can't push on a string and they have been trying to push on a string and if you look at it this is the single worst u.s. recovery in history and obviously, it's the largest single monetary expansion in history. and obviously, they don't work, they just don't work and he's grasping at straws and god knows what type of r
impact on how you look at the economy right now? are are you focused on other factors? >> at this point* i don't see them has any impact it is the actions going forward but it will not have an economic impact worries about people not wanting to go to a large sporting event and fortunately we have had these kinds of episodes before an economic impact has been negligent with so one of the event. but at this point* we did see an increase with the weekly consumer confidence numbers we get out from one survey. quite honestly it is said difficult and challenging period of time. i again, i step back but we are selling back into a realization it is a tough month for the economy. connell: to that point* to get away with the leading economic indicators came in looking at the dow and the generations the leading indicators declined does that tell you anything what was the message of that? >> of course, it doesn't tell us anything we don't know but it is amazing that shift in sentiment people have in the marketplace about the economy with the last four or eight weeks with the turn of the year and th
, and in a fairly weak economy since then did that says people about you hard correspondence they receive from businesses. they want that information in hard copy and they are resisting the idea of going totally digital. we have heard anecdotally a lot of people that did do that and either missed a payment and they have said start those bills back up again. do not write the obituary for first-class mail. it delivers a lot of value for the sender and receiver, and it accounts for $28 billion worth of revenue for the postal service today, and i guarantee it will be around for a long while. the most promising part of our business in terms of growth is package delivery, which is up more than 14% over last year's. we have created much of a credit by innovating and marketing new offerings, and we are benefiting from the big rise in e-commerce. andway people use the mail deliver service is changing it and is an exciting, and these changes will create opportunities for growth for the postal service and drop the entire mailing industry. the postal service is a tremendous organization, with the exceptio
but if we meet in the middle we can do a lot of good for americans and for our economy. we are feeling very good about this, things are moving in a very good way and the supported -- the president supported our proposal it is in the right place to be because even if people don't agree with every single part i don't want to give you the impression he is begrudging but he is enthusiastic. and we are playing it just right moving forward by giving us the space to come up with the agreement and we thank him for doing that and he will continue to do that to get a bill done. >> we briefed the president on a number of details and a proposal that gang of 8 is coming up with that we will be bringing forward to the united states senate as short of a time as this evening. but the process we went through having been in the senate to have this process before was very supportive. the president realizes everybody didn't want -- get what they wanted completely but it is a product of compromise we appreciate his support and we believe that is important as we move forward with the process. that this is the be
and a reminder that the government is a net drag on this u.s. economy. >>> check out auto nation. there is no better gainer on the s&p. stock that's already up 17% this year. >> it's remarkable. >> we all know what pent-up demand is for cars. we all know the mileage that's on the average trade-in. >> i like mike jackson. when you contrast europe with the united states, think of auto nation. okay? they can't move a car in europe. they can't move one across the street. >> you're absolutely right. talk about a dichotomy. >> we are not one world. used cars going up, too? the country you can get, wells fargo largest auto loan company. you can get money for a car. it is tougher to get money. richard smith, i have this guy from realogy. a large real estate company. they're holding their value much more than you thought in the united states. >> morgan stanley is down 3%. talked about m and a, lack of activity saying it just reflects the ceo's lack of confidence with regards to earnings power. >> which is what you hear. those who are doing deals, it is interesting, are the likes of -- or
strong human rights prevail are countries where people do better. economies thrive, rule of law are stronger, governments are more effective and they are countries that leade wod stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't just an indicator that a country is doing well, it unleashes a country's potential and helps to advance growth and progress. i ask you to think of a country like berma for a minute. cause of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reach wrd we want it to be? no but it is on the road and it is moving. more people are participating it ding to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the bermese government is opening their doors and developing stronger partnerships around the world. many challenges remain, corruption has to be rooted out. political prisoners need to be freed. horrible mob violence is another stressing reminder on how long it takes to build what is called the habits of the
of our economy, that is online businesses that are selling to the nation where we have seen tremendous growth, that we owe it to the american people to have this go through regular order. and you know, i have heard the senate leader talk about regular order. i have heard the minority leader, senator mcconnell, talk about regular order, and here we are again not going through regular order. this should go to the finance committee. it should be thoroughly marked up in that committee. and i see senator hatch here. senator baucus and senator hatch both believe that this should go through the proper committee of jurisdiction so that we can address the concerns raised by so many about the bill and the way it is drafted. so with that, mr. president, i would urge my colleagues to vote against closure. this is not the right way to do business. this bill that has very important and negative implications on many businesses in this country and on a very important area of our economy should go through regular order to address concerns that have already been raised by many business groups, and so, m
, beat or miss estimates? as for the economy, here is today's calendar. >> how is the crowd sourcing experiment gone so far? i haven't looked at the results. >> the results for coming. >>? >> i can't even log in to the borrowing page. >> they've gotten some decent numbers that have come this. i think there are 1500 or 1700 -- >> but are they better -- >> they're good at it, but i think we have made the mistake of picking from predictable companies. that's why we started picking some trickier companies like apple. that's the one that's up in the air. nobody knows exactly what's going to happen. if you can beat on these companies, then we're going to be more impressed. >> apple generates a lot of attention and feedback. if i put out on twitter, will apple meet, beat or miss, some people will say it will meet, some will say it will miss and others will stay you stink, sullivan. >> but you will get responses by putting apple out there. >> anything you say on apple, and i'm an apple lifelong user, and i referenced a couple weeks ago that i was going to buy a windows 8 machine because it w
. i know lgt runs some money that's invested into the russian economy. tell us a little bit about the character of this market and whether you can put cash to work here and feel comfortable that you are going to get a return. >> yep. we are invested in the russian market. but it's true, we have a lower allocation to it. the 11% toe 2% sounds quite low. it is a difficult way to access the markets. we see fundamentally from the point of view a strong currency. you look at low valuation, you look at the current surplus, you look at growing middle income class, which wants to consume, so key market indicators are actually strong. the challenge is much more the investment type. so we look at a narrow market, the way you invest is mainly into oil and energy companies. which most of them are state owned to the majority, so we end up being minority investors. what that means is it's still difficult for to us play to the russian growth topic investmentwise. what we can do is we can look at valuation, we can look at it from an optimal point of view. we can see if there is opportunities whic
economy both coming in, you know, more bearish than expectations. what can they do. positive for interest rates. on the other side, we still -- melissa: you think they will step in and do more easing in europe? >> they will cut interest rates. little impact because interest rates are already low. what we need is measures. the ecb could loan some money. melissa: that is an interesting perspective. we are quite bullish on the u.s. economy. we are positive. thinking would be good. this will account for some of the assets. melissa: thank you so much for coming on. lori: we have some updated news for the housing market today. rising 1.5%. that is just shy of the estimates. the pace has increased by 18.5% from year ago. bonuses are getting smaller. they are caving to regulators and scaling back bonuses. the trade journal said the fed started calling banks last year about compensation plans. jon corzine facing a lawsuit now over the collapse of mf global. he is being sued by louie freed. the lawsuit alleges that corzine engaged in risky trading practices. melissa: a vote of confidence and a big
the economy. >> we ask what he would say. >> come see us in detroit, but there are a lot of great things happening here. .ome see what we are doing here >> many campaign promises were made. the most important should be the promised president obama made to himself. in for prestige or wanted to change the lives for the better. politics forinto prestige or wanting to change the lives for the better. the best way would be to change the people or communities the spur them to action. >> congratulations to all the winners. videos, andwinning studentcam.org. >> they say it is not perfect but it is a balance. the group is made up of senator mccain, rubio, d bennett. conference is 50 minutes. afternoon. we are here to announce that eight senators from opposite sides of the political aisle are coming together on a common sense immigration reform proposal we believe we can pass the senate. i want to thank my colleagues. each of us is strong-willed. each of us has differing beliefs, but if you would have seen that room in any of our meetings and seen anyone argue strongly but come together and realiz
. that will be the biggest day for me because they're the big indicators of how the global economy is doing overall. speaking of the global economy, caterpillar if this was clearly a disappointment and the guidance was disappointment and they telegraphed it a little and the stock's been up and the dow this morning and the two things here, number one, he's coming on and talking about stability and that's the key word on our air on cnbc and a lot of people have noted the drop in mining. mining was down 25%. sales in the mining division, second most important was down 25%. i think a lot of people have got that already set up. remember, this is heavily shorted stock and it was $100 two months ago and it's $80 today and a lot of people anticipated what's going on. let me mention apple very quickly. the hope here is for a special dividend, increase the dividend to over a 3% yield and start with the big buyback. that's the big hope there. nobody's expecting them to blow the cover off of any of these numbers and all of them have been coming down. >> guys, back to you. >> watching microsoft continue to gain now up 4.
economy head of the fbi, all said on friday night, boston's back to normal. the public is no longer at recollection. they can't have it both ways. >> shepard: they're trying to. >> can't claim bostones back to normal and the public is not at risk and then say the guy is a risk. the purpose of the exception to the miranda rule is to protect police officers and those around the defendant at the time he is arrested. is that gun empty? y is the other gun? the other bomb? the type of excited utterrans someone would utter at the moment of arrest. it's not a way around the miranda ruling. the miranda ruling requires all government agencies to tell you before they ask you a question you don't have to answer it. the obama administration has taken a radical approach to the miranda rule by coming out of nowhere with this 48 hour rule that doesn't exist in any statute and no court has permitted it. >> going to regret it? >> i think they will. bass opposite they start using it there will be no stop to it. >> shepard: investigators want to talk with the wife of the older bombing suspect. are lawy
, no, it's overcast, a quick question for you, when you talk about the economy booting off again, it seems like you talk about it in terms of consuming, not producing. i'm thinking from the way i think about it, you need something to be produced before it's consumed. so i'm wondering why in terms of a growing economy, you talk about consumption instead of production. that's what it seems like to me. >> well, i do, in order to be able to raise price, you need demand. if there is a shortage of supply, sure, that can mean something, not if you have demand, if you have some product nobody likes, you can't raise the price, it doesn't mean anything. that's why we focus on demand. a company has their stars before you buy i. use the eps to figure out the company's growth rate. take it from there. "mad money" will be right back. . special earnings season companion show. we but them in perspective so you can profit in a warm and confident way, make money at home. we went over how i like to use the reports themselves and went over to figure out whether it's too expensive or too cheap agains
when we return. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> prosecutors are calling it the worst terror attack on u.s. soil since 9/11. the charges filed against him yesterday. it could bring him the death plen penalty. is the case against tsarnaev a slam dunk? my next guest says maybe not. we appreciate you being with us. do you think this young man can blame the whole thing on his brother? certainly from what we're understanding, jake tapper reporting from one government source, it was basically it was his brother who was taking the lead on this and he was kind of following. do you see that as part of -- ultimately what could be part of a defense strategy? >> it could be part of a defense strategy. it is difficult to second guess what another lawyer may do or may not do. certainly, there are some indications in this case that that defense will at least be thorou
buying and the stores and the economy feels and washingtwashingt on feels it >> what you have to do is give people permission and temporarily as a temporary solution. on your feelings right now. neil: they will clue themselves to their couch. >> not permanently nobody wants to be paralyzed by fear to stop living their lives you have to live your life and me appropriately concerned and vigilant but you can stop yourself from living and that is the general of vice -- advice. neil: to give their patients your cellphone number? >> they have it. they don't call me much. neil: to this point* we already had an economy slowing down and earnings we are looking at so even before boston and texas the economy is and was taking a hit. thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't crea the future... by clinging to the past. and wi that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting hist
the economy was already reeling into a recession at that time. and, of course, the economy presumably is coming out with one this time. earnings at that time were torpedoing. earnings right now on the upside so there are a lot of fundamental differences that still the fundamentals are very, very different. we have to watch ourselves. there will be plenty of time to do finger pointing. when you find a politician on either side doing finger pointing at this point i suggest you raise a certain figure at that politician. let's focus on getting these good folks barry, including that 8-year-old boy. sequestration did not kill that little fellow. you know what did? awful people. more after this. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. becausenly national lets you choose any car in t aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and stilpay the misize price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] es, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. yes,
because of the economy, they are desperate, some are bidding on projects they shouldn't take. how do i know i am working with somebody who is appropriate for me? >> if you're paying for that insurance, you're proud to show that certificate and if someone is resistant to show you the proof of insurance, they don't have insurance and it is important with the nature of a lot of the situation now with workman's comp, it is very important, don't let anybody work in her house without the proper insurance. very fair question to ask the contractor to show proof of that insurance. gerri: i want a contract, but tell me one or two things that absolutely must make sure our in those contracts that i know about. >> who is handling everything. the trash and the debris and removal and the permits, some of those things you might not think about are very important and can be very important. not only are you looking at what is included in the contract and what is included in the price, but also what's not included, that's extremely important. gerri: great to see you, you have to come back soon and talk t
again and ain, they can't grow the top line because the economy isn't supporting that. what do you do? how do you respond to that? how do you protect your money? >> well the thing is you have to understand, actually mark hit on a great point, since 2009 revenuesnly grown by about 7% of the earnings have grown by almost 230%. the disparity's come from things like stock buybacks, accounting gimmickry in terms when do we account for stuff and when we don't. and so what drives corporate growth in the stock markets over the long term is that top line revenue, sales. that's what we node to see. that is what --. melissa: lance, i know that, tell me how do i protect my wealth in light of that? i hear what you're saying but you're reiterating what the guys before you said. we already agree with that. how do i protect my money >> i know. the point is we're telling you the strength of the economy the economy is getting a lot weaker here. all recent data shows it. it means cash and fixed income will perform better most likely over nt six to nine months while we g through this process. melissa: ca
is broken. it doesn't meet the needs of our economy and security. we need to move forward with this debate on how to make sure that our immigration system moving forward does meet the needs. >> i'm hearing it sounds like a lot of the things i heard after 9/11 which is that you think really what is broken here when we are talking about this specific case is interagency cooperation. >> we have made great strides over the last ten or 11 years making sure there is better cooperation and communication. more needs to be done. in the case of boston the two suspects we weren't able to track their movements, what they were doing and making sure that we had a handle on some of the folks that did have the opportunity or the proclivity to be involved in terrorism activities. >> if you watched yesterday some serious fireworks during the judiciary committee hearing. let me play that for folks. >> if you have ways to improve the bill, offer an amendment when we start mark up in may. i say that particularly those who are pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as i would say an excuse fo
the economy in so many ways is, you just don't know what the future holds. and so as, to you processing so we can have, you know, a longer period that the communities can plan in? >> i wish i could tell you i knew enough about that answer that for me the unconfirmed on him as you choose proposed rule a really complex and portable and -- that to me as a bit on the short side. so i guess again, my question is would you be willing to look at a longer period of time to have somebody actually, i'm suggesting 90-100 days, but it is based on anything. six is too long. 60 days just to read the stuff is probably adequate, you know? on stuff. would you be willing to i more than happy to look at that issue. >> thank you very much. the other thing is i just, i'm an optometrist by training and so i am familiar with the scientific world. the idea that we have taxpayer financed databases that we can use to conduct cost-benefit analysis by epa or really any other agency or really any other entity that is making these really, you know, the difficult decisions that have tremendous impact, i don't understand wh
of it is just demand in the economy. >> market environment. >> part of it was the premiums being added in because of the uncertainty about how it was going to play out. >> there was all set in the competition played a huge part.
unemployment. and she revolutionized the economy with free-market ideas in her ten years of service that ushered in a new decade of prosperity. when she took office, the top income tax rate was 83%. it was cut to 60% and then to 40%. the middle tax rate was cut to 30%. and the lowest tax rate was eliminated altogether. when she took office, the top corporate tax rate was 53%. she cut it to 35%. the top capital gains tax rate was a stifling 75%. thatcher cut it to 30%. and as a result, a progrowth policies, unemployment fell from a high of 12% early in her tenure to 7.5% near the end. public spending as a percentage of g.d.p. fell from 45.1% of g.d.p. to 39.4% of g.d.p. and inflation fell from almost 22% in 1979 to a low rate of 2.4% in 1986. but perhaps the most telling tribute to margaret thatcher's leadership is that three days after she gave her britain await speech, that heroic speech she was dubbed "the iron lady" in the communist news outlet "the red star." when your military enemies are describing you as formidable as the iron lady, it indicates that you're winning the argume
estimations. it's an indication of a stronger economy, it's an indication of corporations, you know, managing their expenses properly. so it does validate my long-term view, but if somebody told me we were going to have a 5% correction, i would say, look at that as an opportunity to get into the market. >> certainly the way investors are looking at it, once again, today. cnbc contributor, carol roth, says she's not buying the growth story. carol, eric, good to see you. carol, you say you're not buying the growth story. how so? >> i'm not, maria. i seem to be one of the lone voices out there that does not believe that this market is driven by growth. it is driven because of lack of alternatives and because of the fed. larry mentioned something about koch. well, yes, koch beat earnings by 1 cent, but if you look at the year over year revenue, they actually declined. so we have a lot of financial engineering. we have a lot of costs coming out of the cost structure. that is not sustainable. if we want to have growth multiples on an ongoing basis, the topline revenue for these companies needs to g
is a realization now that the market is probably well ahead of itself, based on what the economy is, based on what we're seeing happening around the world in china, certainly what's going on in europe. so the fact is that investors all of a sudden are deciding, geez, we better start paying attention to this news, becausing the market is well ahead of itself. so what you're seeing is the market backing off and really coming back or trying to come back to a state of equilibrium between where the economy is and where the market should be. the whole boston thing and boston marathon and that down in d.c. is certainly adding some angst to the market, but that's not the reason the market is off 170 points. part of it is much more technical just in terms of market action. >> but, michael, when we saw the market come off the lows, it happened to be when we thought there was an arrest. is that a coincidence with the markets? >> i think to some extent, there's going to be a little bit of a relief move if you see some kind of arrest really happen, but these deflationary pressures have been in play since the e
of pulling up the whole economy of the city and the equity model has been a treasure and a great model for other college districts thought the country as well but the city college is facing the biggest crisis. because of the cuts at the state level and the threat in many cases is not only on accreditation but the dismantling the support of immigrant groups and job retraining that's been building up over decades is at risk. the school has come under the scrutiny. those twin challenges of the cuts and accreditation challenge those twin challenges have tested the schools like never before but because of the crisis and county groups have come together to support the city colleges and that's a positive thing that came out of this crisis. because it's time also for our city to think more creativity so we can support from city hall. this resolution that's before us and there's a couple of amendments made by the college of the trustees and other groups. but the resolution first calls for the college to use as much of the funds through ballot prop a that passed last fall by 73 percent margin to
rates. it's tough to make money, michael yoshikami, when you're in that economy and markets are that low. >> it's impossible to make money on the margin. and i think it's important to recognize that what american express is probably getting hit on here is what's happening with tax rates, happened in the first quarter of this year, and the other issue that's really occurring is i think businesses are still holding back on spending. significant percentage of their revenue comes from businesses. and you know, on the long-term, also, we have to be very, very aware, american express, on the long-term, is going to -- >> they're having a fire drill here at the new york stock exchange. >> it was scheduled. >> pre-scheduled, exactly. it was scheduled already. so ignore the noise here happening around me. >> okay. >> very quickly, i want to get to bruce mccain as well, michael. finish your thought. >> my thought was, you have to be careful about companies like paypal, all these other very inexpensive swaywaways to colle money, it will be a hit on american express margins, eventually. >> bruce mcca
today for the next two fiscal years. the mayor said the economy's improving but not all services cut in the past will be restored. the mayor said oakland is on the rise. >> what we're proposing is what i call a fair share budget. it invests heavily in public safety, and economic development and jobs. >> the budget include twos more police academies -- includes two more police academies in the next two years. oakland's also facing increases in pension costs and benefits. hearings are scheduled ahead of the headlines on june 30th. >> this might benefit from the veterans here went through. >> san francisco rings the bell on on a era for a signature attraction, and just wait until you see the new displays at the bigger and better exploratorium. >> the bay area in the clear right now. coming up, how much warmer can you expect for thursday and the warmest day of the upcoming weekend. >>> . . >>> a gas leak in san mateo put residents in a frenzy. two buildings were e vac waited. the repair work is ongoing. >>> continue coverage of the boston marathon bombings. some say the victims will get
that we need to have here for a functioning economy, so i am looking for ways to try to fund that, particularly for essential employees like teachers, nurses, first responders. projects coming up in the city like the renovation of dolores park, which is a once in 50 years opportunity to define what the park is and what changes we want to make to it. that will be a very significant projects. [inaudible] when was the last time it rained? there are puddles. we elect our supervisors by district, and it is very important to pay attention to the district, to be engaged in projects in the district, but we also represent the whole city. any supervisor that just focuses on the district without addressing the citywide issues is not doing his or her job. every day, i'd make sure i am working both on the citywide issues and on district issues. >> i just want to make a public statement to acknowledge that appointments to the police commission and any commission which is a policy-making body is very important. i want to encourage about keep in front of our minds the importance of not only to el
.2 billion for the regional economy. so our long-range development plan is the universities equivalent to other institutions what they prepare. we have over a period of 15 to 20 years the current plan you'll hear about references of how we have changed. the next plan is expected to have a planning horizon of 2035 anticipate that plan with counsel a report which will be certified and adopted. our l ap is driven by our strategy academic plan. this is a that shows our campus. the pink cycles note the major owned sites and the number of cycles represent the amount of is that a we have at the sites. our largest sites are at mission bay and we also have a multiple building site at mount sdooen. our other sites will be the mission building and san francisco general. this table shows you our primary activities and major sites i described. you can see our in patient and outpatient care as well as our regional research plans and housing. at mission bay we have a significant research presence and we have some outpatient clinics that will grow in 20015. at mt. sdooen we have in patient and outpati
. ♪ >>> you hear a lot of people fretting about how economies around the world are doing based on that broad, big-picture macro stuff. that's known as top-down. not me, no. i'm a bottoms up guy. i like to see how individual companies are actually doing, and try to extrapolate from there. take snap-on, the largest distributor of premium hand and power tools, the company that gets the lion's share of its sale from auto repair shops and dealerships. but they also do some business in aerospace, agriculture, construction mining and manufacturing. they're a fabulous read on how all types of companies are doing across this country and in europe, china, too. europe, 21% of snap-on sales. snap-on reported this morning and while the company reported a 6 cent earnings beat, terrific, off a $1.34 basis, revenues came in a bit light, 0.9% higher year over year. in response, the stock got hit. it fell $1.63 or about 2%. it's still up 19% since the last time we spoke with the ceo, and the stock just hit a 52-week high the other day. we need to know more about what snap-on's been up to. so let's drill down
the needs of our economy. convince will have to the republicans to let your people stay. i do not want to be funny. so much is still the same. between becamof the chamber commerce. >> i heard the senate is working very hard to make sure their bill is revenue neutral and that will not cost anything from a cbo score. i also heard the members and not worrying so much about that. >> they are worried. one of the things we are attempting is to make sure the bill does not cost the american that they money and expenses occurred in the implementation are borne by the immigrants themselves. we want a rigorous e-verify getem, a system where you a job, 60 million people initiate a job every year. they go and apply for a job every year. this is yourem verified by the american government as being legally in the united states and legally able to vote. if the employer hire someone who does not go through the system, the weight of the law should fall on them like never seen before. there should be penalties in jail sentences so we do not hire people and documented in the country ever again. upt will co
opening concert about five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you
the next chapter in american history by reinvigorating our economy and enriching ournity. the kind of country that attracted my maternal grandparents here. or my wife's parents, when they came here and became citizens, productive citizens. in vermont immigration has promoted cultural riches, settlements, exchange, economic development, center programs, and tourism and trade with our friends in canada. agricultural workers support our farmers and growers and many have become part of the farm families that are such an integral part of the vermont communities. today's witnesses, two vermonters talking about the needs of farmers and the challenges they face. the national tourism trade is critical to a border state, like vermont. now, let me point out one thing that has troubled me a great deal. last week opponents of comprehensive immigration reform began to exploit the boston marathon bombing. -- newnewfoundlander englander. i spent a lot of time in boston growing up and do so today. friends and relatives there, i urge restraint in that regard. they have enriched this country from our
-blooming self-starters. it's the latest chapter in his look at older workers in the american economy and all part of his on-going reporting "making sense of financial news." >> look at this nice, tight stomach with the abs which you could grate cheese on. >> reporter: at 55, judi henderson-townsend is working with a much younger crowd. >> it's like living in the land of dorian gray here. nobody ever ages. >> reporter: after a career spent working with stiffs in the corporate world, says townsend, she started mannequin madness. >> i sell mannequins, i rent mannequins, i repair mannequins, i blog about mannequins. here in our warehouse, we recycle them for the stores for free and then we resell them or rent them to other people. >> reporter: so you mean all those good looking folk back there were going to be dumped. >> those were going to be tossed into the landfill because the store didn't need them anymore. they're just maybe a few years old, but structurally nothing is wrong with them. it's like having a pre-owned lexus. >> reporter: townsend thinks she's modeling a trend: the rise of the m
care sector which now constitutes more than one sixth of the american economy. it's a cornerstone of security for tens of millions of americans. the growth of this program which will only accelerate as more and more baby boomers retire as a prime driver of our long-term fiscal challenges. there is a wide debate as to whether this lower rate of growth in recent years means we have finally turned the corner or rather will begin to accelerate again as we continue to recover from the great recession. to explore these issues and possible responses to them, we have, i'm delighted to say, assembled an all-star cast. their full biographies are available at this event and also on line so i will just hit the high points in order of their initial presentations. robert reischauer to my immediate left is president of american institute and a former director of the congressional budget office and served as a public trustee of the social security and medicare trust fund. to his left is james capretta a former associate director for heart home health care social security education welfare program
is the current economy, how small businesses develop, and nurture a room for everybody. but i do want to stress that we are very mindful of our neighborhood commercial corridors, the pressures that they feel on a day-to-day basis through parking, through having to repair their sidewalks, many thanks. i want to convey with confidence that that is not forgotten and it will be taking into consideration as we move forward with what we are doing. and then, with regards -- moving on to the disability access, the california commission on disability access asked for presentation and what seven cisco was doing on education and outreach as part of 1186; it mandates that the california commission on disability access develop and outreach and educational program and so they invited me up to give a presentation about what san francisco is doing, taking a look at some of the best practices that are happening and they were very impressed with what we have developed in terms of the program through our office and with the program, with the investment in neighborhoods. and then, we should be hearing from the st
: you can come here and help us understand the economy for start starters. >> yeah, that would be fun. that would be fun. >> rose: thank you, congratulations. >> well thanks for having me on. >> rose: rick levin. 20 years, 1993 to 2013 as president of yale university came and yale was not in great shape, he leaves it in fantastic shape. thank you for joining us. see you next time. . >> this is "nightly business report," brought to on you by thestreet.com. multi-media tools for an ever changing financial world. real money helps you think through ideas for investing and trading stocks. action alerts plus is a charitable portfolio that provides trade by trade strategies. online, mobile, social media, we are thestreet.com. a big win for netflix, the stock soaring more than 20% after hours on a strong earnings report. but a big miss for caterpillars they fall short of estimates and the ceo talks about the health of the global economy. and cracked foundation, is the shortage of homes for sale creating a speed bump for the recovery. >>> good everyone, it was a strong earning report late in t
was not working. >> that's a good point. you thought maybe stand above all of the other lesser economies and the news did start to tighten. >> i thought it was the most important article in the paper. maybe they're breaking ranks [ bell ringing ] >> and his own jack lou? >> hard to tell. >> they are geniuses. >> i took economics, and i couldn't wait how long they were. >> there's the bell. s&p at the top of the screen. state street global advisers and blackstone celebrating the recent launch of the spider, senior loan etf. the texas independent producers and the royalty owners association doing the honors. you cannot start this market day, jim, without talking about netflix. a 25% move is a big move even on that name. >> that was a big short position. there was not a lot of stock that was out there. it's a very tight flow. >> a lot of people kept thinking that this is the quarter where we find that the bulge in new subscribers wasn't happening and there are other people who immediately point out, look, the cash flow is not that good and the 36 analysts who cover the stock only six are re
to stop playing some defense with high-needing food stocks that can thrive, even when the global economy is in dire straits. take long-time cramer fave b & g foods, neglected brands from larger players, private equity firms, and bringing them back to it life. you might know b & g as pickles. b & g just reported last thursday and the company delivered an excellent quarter with in-line earnings and revenues that came in higher than expected, rising 8.8% year over year. we don't have a lot of companies in the food business that gained like that. meanwhile, the company raises for guidance, earnings before interest, taxes and depreciation and amortization. it jumped from $28 to $30 the next day and continuing to climb, $31.08 and 3.75% yield at these levels. b & g has given a 186% return since i initially recommended in october of 2010. the valuation may seem stretched with the stock trading at 19 times earnings. however, every time the stocks seem too expensive to own, they seem to go higher anyway. let's check in with the president of b & g foods and find out more about the quarter and wher
nearly 158 points while the nasdaq closed up 48. restored confidence in the world's number one economy sent asian stocks higher this morning. tokyo's nikkei rose 1%. hong kong's hang seng added a fraction. >>> more signs the housing market is recovering. builders started work on a million new homes in march. that hasn't happened since june 2008. and it was fueled by a surge in apartment building construction but single-family home construction fell by nearly 5%. >>> the international monetary fund now predicts global economy will grow by 3.3% this year. that's down two-tenths of a point since its january forecast. the imf says the u.s. economy will expand by a slightly smaller 1.9% while the eurozone economies were shrink slightly. back to you. >> and we understand car ownership and believe me we all know this here in san francisco but it comes with a big price tag, too, doesn't it? >> it sure does. a new report out by aaa found that owning an average sedan will drain about $9,100 a year from your wallet when you factor in gas, insurance and maintenance and tires and that cost is actu
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